Frontiers is committed to respecting and protecting your privacy.  For the purposes of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and any subsequent UK legislation covering data protection the Data Controller is Frontiers.  The person responsible for data protection in the organisation is the Data Protection Co-ordinator.  If you have any questions about this Policy or concerning your personal information held by Frontiers please:-

Call us on: 0303 333 5051

Email us: data-requests@frontiers.org.uk

Write to us: Frontiers, PO Box 1445, High Wycombe, HP12 9BU

This Policy sets out why we collect personal information about individuals and how we use that information.  It describes the legal basis for this and explains the rights you have over the way your information is used.

WHAT INFORMATION WE COLLECT

We collect information:

  • When you give it to us directly

We collect personal information, including your name and contact details, each time you deal with us.  For example, when you make a donation, request materials or information, sign up for an event, complete an application form to work with us, volunteer or contact us for any other reason.

  • When you use our website

We collect non-personal data such as IP addresses, details of pages visited and files downloaded.  Website information is collected using cookies, see the section on Cookies below.

  • When it is available on social media

We may collect information you make available on, for example, Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.  You may wish to check their privacy policies to find out more information about how they process your data.

  • From publicly available data

We may collect information from Companies House, the Charities Commission and information published in articles, newspapers or blogs.

  • Indirectly from third parties

We may collect information from third parties, such as event organisers or referees for applications, where you have given your consent.  You may wish to check their privacy policies to find out more information about how they process your data.

HOW WE USE YOUR INFORMATION

We may use your personal information to:

  • Provide information or services you have requested
  • Keep you up to date on news and stories about our mission and events
  • Process donations you give us, including gift aid
  • Keep records of your relationship with us, e.g. questions you have asked or complaints you have made
  • Organise volunteering activities you have told us you would like to be involved with
  • Seek your views on services or activities we provide so we can make improvements
  • Maintain our organisational records and ensure we know how you prefer to be contacted
  • Process applications for work or ministry, either in the UK or overseas.

OUR LEGAL BASIS FOR PROCESSING YOUR INFORMATION

The use of your information for the purposes set out above is lawful because one or more of the following applies:

  • Consent

Where you have provided information to us for the purposes of requesting information, working with us, or that we carry out a service for you, we will proceed on the basis that you have given consent to us using the information for that purpose.  You may withdraw consent at any time by emailing us at the email address above.  This will not affect the lawfulness of processing of your information prior to your withdrawal of consent being received and actioned.

  • Legitimate interest

Where you have previously requested information, services or events, we may contact you again if similar new information, services or events become available that might be of interest to you.  Where you have previously made a donation, we may continue to send you information about the work your donation has made possible or other work we wish to undertake.  Where you have previously asked us not to contact you in a particular way we will continue to respect your preferences.  You can change your contact preferences at any time or object to us processing your data by contacting us by telephone, post or email as shown above

  • Legal obligations

We may need to process or retain certain information from you to fulfil our duties under UK law, for example for audit, tax and gift aid purposes.

HOW WE KEEP YOUR INFORMATION SAFE

We have controls in place to protect any personal data you provide.  For example, online forms are encrypted and our network is protected and routinely security checked.

Access to personal data is restricted only to those staff members whose job-roles require such access.  Suitable training is provided for all our staff.

However, no data transmission over the internet can be guaranteed to be 100% secure.  While we strive to safeguard your information, we cannot guarantee the security of any information you provide online and you do this at your own risk.

We use cloud-based systems to process data and therefore data may be processed outside of the European Economic Area (EEA).  We adopt the Information Commissioners approved measures and therefore ensure that personal data is held in compliance with European data protection regulations.  We take all reasonable steps to ensure that your data is stored and processed securely in accordance with this policy.  By submitting your personal data you agree to this transfer, storing and processing of your information.

HOW LONG WE KEEP YOUR INFORMATION

We will keep your personal information only as long as it is necessary for the relevant activity.  We have a Records Retention Policy to implement this, which takes account of our legal, accounting and tax obligations, as well as considering what would be reasonable for each activity.  For example, we may retain details of donations for seven years to meet tax and accounting requirements, but keep sensitive medical personal information provided for a short-term overseas trip only until that trip is completed.  If you have any questions about our Records Retention Policy, please contact our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above

WHEN WE SHARE YOUR INFORMATION

  • A few third parties provide services for us, for example sending mail and processing donations.  We select these service providers with care, share only the information necessary to provide the relevant service and have agreements in place requiring them to operate with the same care over data protection as ourselves.
  • We occasionally share information with third parties when running joint events with them.  We will let you know if any data might be shared when you register for an event.
  • Should you apply to travel overseas with us, we may share personal information with partners in overseas locations.  This may include sensitive personal data such as medical information.  We will obtain your consent before any data is transferred.
  • We may also disclose your personal information if required to do so by a legal obligation, or for the purposes of fraud prevention, or where doing so would not infringe your rights, but is necessary and in the public interest.  Otherwise we will not share your information with other organisations without your consent.

COOKIES

What are Cookies?
A cookie is a text file sent from our website as soon as you visit the site.  It is stored on your computer's hard drive and helps us to identify your computer (not you) and collects information in an aggregate, anonymous way.

Cookies may be used to collect information about your visit to our website, for example, traffic data, location data, device information, date and time, and pages you visit.

The use of cookies is an industry standard for most major websites.  You can find more information about cookies by follow these two links - http://www.allaboutcookies.org/ or https://www.aboutcookies.org/

Our use of cookies on our website
To enjoy our website to the full, we recommend that you leave cookies turned on.  If you turn off cookies then you may not be able to access parts of the site.

The cookie data we collect may be used to:

  • Customise our website's content and help our visitors' current and future needs
  • Process any requests, applications or transactions you may make
  • Aid our internal administration and analysis

Managing cookies
 Most browsers allow you to turn off the cookie function.  To do this you can look at the help function on your browser.

Third party cookies
We work with several third party suppliers who set cookies on our website to enable them to provide us with services.  These are mainly used for reporting and to help improve the way we communicate.

We use websites such as YouTube to embed videos and you may be sent cookies from these websites.  We do not control the setting of these cookies, so we suggest you check third party websites for more information about their cookies and how to manage them.

We also use third party suppliers such as Google Analytics who may also use cookies.  They may also use tracking pixels, which are commonly found in advertising to track the effectiveness of adverts.

As some of these services may be based outside of the UK and the European Union, they may not fall under UK legislation.  If you are concerned about this, you can change your cookie settings (see above) and can find more information about this here - https://ico.org.uk/

YOUR CHOICES AND TELLING US WHEN THINGS CHANGE

 Preferences
You can change your preferences on what you receive from us or how we contact you, by contacting our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above.

Updating your details
We do appreciate it if you keep your details up to date.  You can do so in the same way as updating your preferences (above).

We may use Post Office address search, postcode lists or other sources to confirm data that you provide us with if, for example, we are unsure of what you have completed on a form.

We will not use these sources to create data that you have chosen not to provide, for example, if you have left a telephone number blank; nor will we automatically update changes of address, we will normally only update your address when you tell us it's changed.  However, if you are a regular giver and mail is returned to us, we may use external sources to update your address details to enable us to inform you on how your money is being spent.

YOUR RIGHTS

You have the right to request details of the processing activities that we carry out with your personal information through making a Subject Access Request.  Such requests have to be made in writing and exceptionally may be subject to a charge.  More details about how to make a request, and the procedure to be followed, can be found in our Data Protection Policy.  To make a request contact us at data-requests@frontiers.org.uk

You also have the following rights:

  • the right to request rectification of information that is inaccurate or out of date;
  • the right to erasure of your information (known as the "right to be forgotten");
  • the right to restrict the way in which we are using your information; and
  • the right to request that your information be provided to you in a format that is secure and suitable for re-use (known as the "right to portability");

All of these rights are subject to certain safeguards and limits or exemptions, further details of which can be found in our Data Protection Policy.  To exercise any of these rights, you should contact our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above.

If you are not happy with the way in which we have processed or dealt with your information, you can complain to the Information Commissioner's Office.  Further details about how to complain can be found at https://www.dataprotection.ie/docs/Making-a-Complaint-to-the-Data-Protection-Commissioner/r/18.htm

CHANGES TO THIS PRIVACY POLICY

This policy was last updated in March 2018.  We may amend this policy from time to time to take account of changes to our processes or changes to data protection or other legislation.  If we make any significant changes to this policy we will show this clearly on our website, in our publications such as Connected or by writing to you directly.  By continuing to use our website you will be deemed to have accepted these changes.

1 day ago

Friday 15th February

Turkmen Pop: 7.8 million

The majority of Turkmen, 4.8 million, live in Turkmenistan, which is located in south Central Asia along the Caspian Sea. Many others live in the surrounding Asian nations of Kazakhstan, Iran, Afghanistan and Uzbekistan.

Their...

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2 days ago

Thursday 14th February

A trip among nomads in Central Asia - from a Frontiers worker (continued)

“Eighteen young people spent five weeks trekking across barren deserts and high mountain pastures on this five week trip.

A total of nineteen mentors (including three Central...

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3 days ago

Wednesday 13th February

A trip among nomads in Central Asia - from a Frontiers worker

“Malcolm Hunter, founder of the Nomadic Peoples Network, saw the need among the millions of unengaged nomads as an injustice and cried out to God. Malcolm’s dream was to train and mobilise mor...

Read More

4 days ago

Tuesday 12th February

How do gospel workers reach nomads?

The Church, composed mainly of settled people, struggles to engage with nomads. Few nomads have embraced Christ and those that have met gospel workers or the wider Christian body, have often understood that Christianity is a...

Read More

5 days ago

Nomads – neglected millions

Over 3,000 years ago God called a nomad and promised to bless all peoples through him (Gen 12). His name was Abram until God changed his name to Abraham, which means "father of a multitude" (Genesis 17:5). Jesus too was a nomad, moving from place to place to li...

Read More

1 week ago

Saturday 9th February

Screwdriver and the Gang – a story from a Frontiers worker

Mark and his team didn’t expect to get involved with the local gang when they opened up a fitness centre in a city in Central Asia.

From opening day, the gym was filled with young Muslim ...

Read More

1 day ago

Friday 15th February

Turkmen Pop: 7.8 million

The majority of Turkmen, 4.8 million, live in Turkmenistan, which is located in south Central Asia along the Caspian Sea. Many others live in the surrounding Asian nations of Kazakhstan, Iran, Afghanistan and Uzbekistan.

Their culture has been strongly influenced in the past by both the Turkic conquerors, who imposed their language on them, and the Arabs, who forced them to convert to Islam. Long ago, they developed a strong ethnic identity as ‘children of the desert’ because they would plunder rich caravans of Persian traders.

In the 17th century, the Turkmen, or Trukhmens as they were called in Russia, migrated into the Caucasus in Central Asia.

For centuries the Turkmen lived as nomadic herdsmen. However, seventy years of Soviet rule virtually eliminated their nomadic lifestyle. The socialisation of farmland has changed their traditional settlement patterns, and movement into the cities has naturally weakened their customs and traditions.

Nomadic Turkmen are known as charwa. They raise sheep and goats for sale in town markets. When the pasture dries up during the summer and autumn they stay in camps near the permanent water sources. When it rains they move short distances to use the growing grass. During the summer when shepherding is less intensive, the flocks are left in the hands of the younger men, while other family members engage in limited cultivation. They also grow cotton and then weave and sell perhaps the finest carpets in Central Asia.

The Turkmen are a proud people who have never really been loved by anyone, have suffered much and have had very little Christian witness. A gospel witness to Turkmen will be most effective coming from other Turkmen who are culturally sensitive. Turkmen pastors face great hardship and persecution. Some have been fined, beaten and put in jail.

• Ask the Lord to call people who are willing to live among the Turkmen and share with them the love of Christ.

• Pray for a gospel witness among every Turkmen tribe, clan and family.

• Ask God to strengthen, encourage and protect the small number of Turkmen believers and ask that they will have courage, joy and opportunities to share the gospel with their own people.

Source of some material: https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/15654/TX
David Phillips book “People on the move”

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2 days ago

Thursday 14th February

A trip among nomads in Central Asia - from a Frontiers worker (continued)

“Eighteen young people spent five weeks trekking across barren deserts and high mountain pastures on this five week trip.

A total of nineteen mentors (including three Central Asian Muslim background believers) dropped into the teams for a few weeks each.

On one memorable day in Kyrgyzstan, a Kyrgyz pastor invited six trekkers and four mentors to his sister’s village home. As we arrived, our hosts seated us in order of our age and served a grand spread of tea, dates, apples, plums, dried apricots, prunes, biscuits, varieties of flaky pastries, and berry sauces to spoon in to the tea.
Afterwards, as they gave us a tour of the compound, we noticed a sheep grazing near the kitchen building. After some introductory explanations, two men laid the sheep down, cut the sheep’s throat, and drained its blood. One of the students commented on how silently the sheep approached its slaughter.

Some men began skinning and gutting the sheep and the women took internal organs away to clean. As the butchers and cooks carried on with their messy work, our hosts explained the significance their culture gives to the way the sheep is cut into parts and how and why it would be divided among certain families in the community.

Several hours later, they ushered us to the dining area, then seated us (in age order again, of course) for a great feast of lamb. A pitcher of water, a large bowl, and a towel were brought in. Water was poured over each person’s hands while we rubbed and then carefully squeezed water off our hands without shaking or splattering just as the pastor demonstrated. Portions from the fat tail were served to the oldest man, the oldest woman, and the youngest among us. The final dish was finely chopped meat with noodles, and it was all washed down with a fermented mare’s milk or a greasy broth.

After we had expressed our appreciation for very full bellies, we were ushered into another room for yet more tea and snacks!

Experiences like this gave our truck trekkers a taste of life among Central Asian nomads – helping them learn to think like a nomad so that they can learn to “put the church on the back of a camel.”

After the trip as we debriefed, tears, anxious facial expressions, frustrations and fears poured out. The students admitted that the trip was very hard – “at times too hard.”

But joy and hope poured out, too. Participants emphatically said that it changed them for the better and they were very glad they came.
Six are now praying seriously about how God might use them among nomads in the future. All participants said they were at least considering long-term service or will advocate on behalf of nomads in their churches at home.

Praise God, just in the past few days we’ve heard from one of the participants, an existing Frontiers member, who has started working among nomads in Northeast Africa.

As a result of all this, I and others have committed to another trip in the future, this time across the Sahel of Africa.”

• Let’s pray for all the young people who went on this trip, that they will see how God is using this experience in their lives for the cause of reaching nomads.

• Pray for the six young people who are seriously seeking God about the path He has mapped out for them regarding nomads. May they know his leading and guidance.

• Let’s pray for the Frontiers worker who has started working among nomads in Northeast Africa, that he will know God’s protection, favour and blessing in his ministry.

• Let’s pray for the planned trip across the Sahel of Africa, that God will go before it and prepare the way.

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3 days ago

Wednesday 13th February

A trip among nomads in Central Asia - from a Frontiers worker

“Malcolm Hunter, founder of the Nomadic Peoples Network, saw the need among the millions of unengaged nomads as an injustice and cried out to God. Malcolm’s dream was to train and mobilise more workers for these nomadic peoples. Malcolm shared his vision for a mobile workshop to initiate new workers at the Nomadic Peoples Network conference in 2015. Last year, a consortium of agencies ran a truck adventure trekking from one nomadic group to another – crossing Central Asia from Tiblisi, Georgia to Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan and back again.
The truck venture was the culmination of Malcolm’s dream.
A number of organisations like Frontiers were involved, providing the logistical support and recruiting the participants.
The truck venture was an experiment to expose potential new workers to nomads and their lifestyles, and train them on how to reach nomads.
At the same time we mobilisers, including Frontiers, wrestled with the question of how to recruit and equip the right people to effectively engage nomads. Our goals were to attract adventurous, Jesus-following learners with a pioneering spirit; to expose them to challenges to test whether they’re cross-culturally adept, persistent in prayer, cohesive team players, and able to endure hardship. We also aimed to train them to recognise and appreciate nomadic cultures, thrive on the move, learn from nomadic culture, and minister to them appropriately. We sought to help them see the spiritual dynamics of the good news for nomads in community relationships rather than in buildings and institutions. We helped them consider how their gifts and occupational interests might be used in such settings, and we prayed for each of the countries and peoples we encountered.
Nomads are even more likely than other Muslim peoples to have no one engaging with them. That’s probably because they present unique challenges. One national believer who’s seeking to work among Southeast Asian nomads asked me, “How can you plant a church when the people don’t stay put?”
Our trip across Central Asia sought to expose potential candidates to such quandaries of working among nomads.”
• Father we thank you for Malcolm Hunter and his passion and heart for nomadic peoples. We ask you to bless, encourage and equip him for the ministry you have given him.

• We thank you for Malcolm’s vision to train and mobilise more workers to reach nomadic peoples. We pray for much fruit from this trip.

• Pray for the different agencies involved in this trip, that they will catch the vision in even greater measure and take the task of reaching nomads to a greater audience.

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4 days ago

Tuesday 12th February

How do gospel workers reach nomads?

The Church, composed mainly of settled people, struggles to engage with nomads. Few nomads have embraced Christ and those that have met gospel workers or the wider Christian body, have often understood that Christianity is a religion for settled people. Talk of “the Sower” or being “fishers of men” is often alien and consequently not readily understood.

We cannot and should not expect nomads to take on values and practices bound up with a settled way of life - these are not part of the gospel! Does church for a nomad consist of meeting in a building or chatting and praying around a camp fire or water-hole about the Good Shepherd? One Somali nomad was heard to remark, “Show me how to put a Church on my camel before you talk to me of Jesus.”

We can serve these neglected people, meeting needs such as healthcare for them and their animals, live alongside them for short or extended periods, but also we must communicate with nomadic peoples that following Jesus is compatible with their lifestyle.

In David Phillips’ book, “Peoples on the move” he writes: “The nomads need us to live as Christians within the nomadic life, at their level as much as possible. The great Shepherd looks for committed disciples to befriend the world’s nomads, to learn the nomads’ languages and skills and, through the shared experience of their lives, to make Him known. His love needs to be shown in practical ways to enhance the people’s nomadism, in education, community health, veterinary and medical help and land management. We need to understand their beliefs and unanswered fears and introduce the nomadic shepherd God of the Bible to them. We need to demonstrate by example that the great Shepherd is really at home in the nomads’ tents.”

Only with nomads will the Church of Christ be complete. Nomads are strategic partners that can spread the good news not only to other nomads but also to settled people whom they meet as they travel.

• Pray for gospel workers who are prepared to forgo many comforts to learn to share the gospel with nomads.

• Pray for the nomads who have come to know Jesus, to take the gospel not only to other nomads, but to millions of settled people around.

• Pray for followers of Christ who are willing to reach nomadic Muslim people groups, no matter what it takes or what the cost.

“May nomads have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ.” (Eph 3:18).

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5 days ago

Nomads – neglected millions

Over 3,000 years ago God called a nomad and promised to bless all peoples through him (Gen 12). His name was Abram until God changed his name to Abraham, which means "father of a multitude" (Genesis 17:5). Jesus too was a nomad, moving from place to place to live out his ministry here on earth.

Nomads are among the least reached peoples in the world. Today there are 184 nomadic Muslim people groups, totalling 170 million people worldwide. Unfortunately the majority, 174 people groups, comprising 118,835,200 are still severely under-engaged. 35 of these groups have populations over 1 million.

They include the Bedouin Arab groups in the Middle East and Africa, the Fulani and Tuareg of the Sahel and Sahara in Africa and the Beja of Sudan and surrounding countries. In Asia, the Muslim Kazakh and other Central Asian Turkic peoples are pastoralists or recently settled in cities.

The nomadic pastoralists’ livelihood and culture is based on keeping domestic animals and seeking pasture for them. They are usually monetarily poor and move with their sheep, goats, cattle, camels and horses to find grazing in the arid regions of the world. Their lifestyle and world-view is bound to their animals. Other nomads are peripatetics. These are the travelling craftsmen, entertainers and traders. They habitually travel with a trade to earn their living, such as many Muslim Roma in Eastern Europe and the Gypsies of Central Asia, including those in Tajikistan.

Governments have looked on nomads with suspicion and have tried to make them settle, as it is easier to tax or provide services such as education when you know someone’s address. Often nomads have resisted these changes or the changes have led to social breakdown. Tensions exist and sometimes marginalised groups resort to armed conflict, such as the current conflict in the southern Sahel involving some Tuaregs.

Nomads are often viewed with suspicion by society and by Christians and are seen as misfits. Their wandering lifestyle is seen as irresponsible and uncivilised. It is widely believed that if they ceased to be nomads and settled and adapted to a more accountable and acceptable lifestyle, then they could be accommodated and discipled.

However, even when nomads settle for extended periods for economic or other reasons they still have the heartbeat of and think like a nomad. Kazakhs provided with accommodation in a block of flats will set up a traditional round yurt in the garden for watching television and socialising.

As nomadic identity is wrapped up in their lifestyle they must be given special consideration in order to reach them with the gospel. Nomads need gospel workers dedicated to living and adapting themselves to a totally unfamiliar society, often without basic comforts for a considerable period of time. This lifestyle of discomfort and upheaval discourages many from working with nomads.

• Father we ask you to give gospel workers creative ways to live out the community of faith and ‘do church’ in a nomadic way.

• Let’s pray that nomadic people, so often shunned by society, will find acceptance in a relationship with the Good Shepherd.

• Let’s ask for more labourers who are willing to go and understand the nomadic worldview and communicate the good news in a relevant way.

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1 week ago

Saturday 9th February

Screwdriver and the Gang – a story from a Frontiers worker

Mark and his team didn’t expect to get involved with the local gang when they opened up a fitness centre in a city in Central Asia.

From opening day, the gym was filled with young Muslim men from the neighbourhood. About twenty of them started showing up each day.

One day, a tall young man walked in. He had a commanding presence and his arms were covered in tattoos, which are frowned upon in the conservative Muslim community. Other men in the gym seemed to respect him. They deferred to him when he talked to them and they treated him as a man of influence.
He was called the Screwdriver. His gang controlled the neighbourhood around the fitness centre. Whenever someone needed to borrow money, the Screwdriver was the lender.

That also made him the collector—and a brutal one if needed.

The Screwdriver became one of the regulars at the fitness centre. He worked out with the other young men and often chatted with Mark and his teammates who helped run the centre.

“My family members are all Muslims,” the Screwdriver told Mark one day. “But we don’t really practice Islam.”

He described the rough life he had lived and had little hope he could ever earn his way into heaven like good Muslims are taught to do. “I’ve sinned far too much,” he shared.

“All have sinned,” Mark explained to the Screwdriver, “and no one can earn their way to heaven.” He shared that it doesn’t matter how religious we are - we still can’t depend on our own devices to save us.

“But there is a solution to sin,” Mark added. He described how Jesus made a way for us to enter God’s Kingdom. The Screwdriver listened as Mark shared that hope, peace and forgiveness are available through Christ.

“Then the only way I am getting into heaven,” the Screwdriver stated, “is if God forgives me through Jesus Christ.”

The two men prayed together and the Screwdriver became a disciple of Jesus Christ and committed to learning more from the Bible. He shared the gospel with his brother, mother and several of his friends, and they also believed. Many of his gang members also started following Jesus.

It’s been months since then and the Screwdriver is still growing in his faith and studying the Word. He’s also sharing the Good News with others and many more Muslim men and women have discovered Jesus Christ through his witness.

• Praise God for using this team’s fitness centre to introduce the Screwdriver to Christ. Pray for the Screwdriver, his gang members, and his family to grow in love for Jesus, knowledge of the Word and passion for expanding the Kingdom.

• Ask the Lord to lead Frontiers teams in Kazakstan, Central Asia and around the world to men and women of influence for His glory!

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It’s in the everyday Overlay

It’s in the everyday 14th Feb 2019

Tell me about your family Yusuf… Are you the eldest son?”; “Do you feel that people have expectations of you that you can’t meet?”; “Do you struggle to control your temper?”

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Friday 15th February

Turkmen Pop: 7.8 million

The majority of Turkmen, 4.8 million, live in Turkmenistan, which is located in south Central Asia along the Caspian Sea. Many others li...

Pray Now
Called to the Nations Overlay 09 Feb 2019 09:00 - 20:30
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Called to the Nations

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