Frontiers is committed to respecting and protecting your privacy.  For the purposes of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and any subsequent UK legislation covering data protection the Data Controller is Frontiers.  The person responsible for data protection in the organisation is the Data Protection Co-ordinator.  If you have any questions about this Policy or concerning your personal information held by Frontiers please:-

Call us on: 0303 333 5051

Email us: data-requests@frontiers.org.uk

Write to us: Frontiers, PO Box 1445, High Wycombe, HP12 9BU

This Policy sets out why we collect personal information about individuals and how we use that information.  It describes the legal basis for this and explains the rights you have over the way your information is used.

WHAT INFORMATION WE COLLECT

We collect information:

  • When you give it to us directly

We collect personal information, including your name and contact details, each time you deal with us.  For example, when you make a donation, request materials or information, sign up for an event, complete an application form to work with us, volunteer or contact us for any other reason.

  • When you use our website

We collect non-personal data such as IP addresses, details of pages visited and files downloaded.  Website information is collected using cookies, see the section on Cookies below.

  • When it is available on social media

We may collect information you make available on, for example, Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.  You may wish to check their privacy policies to find out more information about how they process your data.

  • From publicly available data

We may collect information from Companies House, the Charities Commission and information published in articles, newspapers or blogs.

  • Indirectly from third parties

We may collect information from third parties, such as event organisers or referees for applications, where you have given your consent.  You may wish to check their privacy policies to find out more information about how they process your data.

HOW WE USE YOUR INFORMATION

We may use your personal information to:

  • Provide information or services you have requested
  • Keep you up to date on news and stories about our mission and events
  • Process donations you give us, including gift aid
  • Keep records of your relationship with us, e.g. questions you have asked or complaints you have made
  • Organise volunteering activities you have told us you would like to be involved with
  • Seek your views on services or activities we provide so we can make improvements
  • Maintain our organisational records and ensure we know how you prefer to be contacted
  • Process applications for work or ministry, either in the UK or overseas.

OUR LEGAL BASIS FOR PROCESSING YOUR INFORMATION

The use of your information for the purposes set out above is lawful because one or more of the following applies:

  • Consent

Where you have provided information to us for the purposes of requesting information, working with us, or that we carry out a service for you, we will proceed on the basis that you have given consent to us using the information for that purpose.  You may withdraw consent at any time by emailing us at the email address above.  This will not affect the lawfulness of processing of your information prior to your withdrawal of consent being received and actioned.

  • Legitimate interest

Where you have previously requested information, services or events, we may contact you again if similar new information, services or events become available that might be of interest to you.  Where you have previously made a donation, we may continue to send you information about the work your donation has made possible or other work we wish to undertake.  Where you have previously asked us not to contact you in a particular way we will continue to respect your preferences.  You can change your contact preferences at any time or object to us processing your data by contacting us by telephone, post or email as shown above

  • Legal obligations

We may need to process or retain certain information from you to fulfil our duties under UK law, for example for audit, tax and gift aid purposes.

HOW WE KEEP YOUR INFORMATION SAFE

We have controls in place to protect any personal data you provide.  For example, online forms are encrypted and our network is protected and routinely security checked.

Access to personal data is restricted only to those staff members whose job-roles require such access.  Suitable training is provided for all our staff.

However, no data transmission over the internet can be guaranteed to be 100% secure.  While we strive to safeguard your information, we cannot guarantee the security of any information you provide online and you do this at your own risk.

We use cloud-based systems to process data and therefore data may be processed outside of the European Economic Area (EEA).  We adopt the Information Commissioners approved measures and therefore ensure that personal data is held in compliance with European data protection regulations.  We take all reasonable steps to ensure that your data is stored and processed securely in accordance with this policy.  By submitting your personal data you agree to this transfer, storing and processing of your information.

HOW LONG WE KEEP YOUR INFORMATION

We will keep your personal information only as long as it is necessary for the relevant activity.  We have a Records Retention Policy to implement this, which takes account of our legal, accounting and tax obligations, as well as considering what would be reasonable for each activity.  For example, we may retain details of donations for seven years to meet tax and accounting requirements, but keep sensitive medical personal information provided for a short-term overseas trip only until that trip is completed.  If you have any questions about our Records Retention Policy, please contact our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above

WHEN WE SHARE YOUR INFORMATION

  • A few third parties provide services for us, for example sending mail and processing donations.  We select these service providers with care, share only the information necessary to provide the relevant service and have agreements in place requiring them to operate with the same care over data protection as ourselves.
  • We occasionally share information with third parties when running joint events with them.  We will let you know if any data might be shared when you register for an event.
  • Should you apply to travel overseas with us, we may share personal information with partners in overseas locations.  This may include sensitive personal data such as medical information.  We will obtain your consent before any data is transferred.
  • We may also disclose your personal information if required to do so by a legal obligation, or for the purposes of fraud prevention, or where doing so would not infringe your rights, but is necessary and in the public interest.  Otherwise we will not share your information with other organisations without your consent.

COOKIES

What are Cookies?
A cookie is a text file sent from our website as soon as you visit the site.  It is stored on your computer's hard drive and helps us to identify your computer (not you) and collects information in an aggregate, anonymous way.

Cookies may be used to collect information about your visit to our website, for example, traffic data, location data, device information, date and time, and pages you visit.

The use of cookies is an industry standard for most major websites.  You can find more information about cookies by follow these two links - http://www.allaboutcookies.org/ or https://www.aboutcookies.org/

Our use of cookies on our website
To enjoy our website to the full, we recommend that you leave cookies turned on.  If you turn off cookies then you may not be able to access parts of the site.

The cookie data we collect may be used to:

  • Customise our website's content and help our visitors' current and future needs
  • Process any requests, applications or transactions you may make
  • Aid our internal administration and analysis

Managing cookies
 Most browsers allow you to turn off the cookie function.  To do this you can look at the help function on your browser.

Third party cookies
We work with several third party suppliers who set cookies on our website to enable them to provide us with services.  These are mainly used for reporting and to help improve the way we communicate.

We use websites such as YouTube to embed videos and you may be sent cookies from these websites.  We do not control the setting of these cookies, so we suggest you check third party websites for more information about their cookies and how to manage them.

We also use third party suppliers such as Google Analytics who may also use cookies.  They may also use tracking pixels, which are commonly found in advertising to track the effectiveness of adverts.

As some of these services may be based outside of the UK and the European Union, they may not fall under UK legislation.  If you are concerned about this, you can change your cookie settings (see above) and can find more information about this here - https://ico.org.uk/

YOUR CHOICES AND TELLING US WHEN THINGS CHANGE

 Preferences
You can change your preferences on what you receive from us or how we contact you, by contacting our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above.

Updating your details
We do appreciate it if you keep your details up to date.  You can do so in the same way as updating your preferences (above).

We may use Post Office address search, postcode lists or other sources to confirm data that you provide us with if, for example, we are unsure of what you have completed on a form.

We will not use these sources to create data that you have chosen not to provide, for example, if you have left a telephone number blank; nor will we automatically update changes of address, we will normally only update your address when you tell us it's changed.  However, if you are a regular giver and mail is returned to us, we may use external sources to update your address details to enable us to inform you on how your money is being spent.

YOUR RIGHTS

You have the right to request details of the processing activities that we carry out with your personal information through making a Subject Access Request.  Such requests have to be made in writing and exceptionally may be subject to a charge.  More details about how to make a request, and the procedure to be followed, can be found in our Data Protection Policy.  To make a request contact us at data-requests@frontiers.org.uk

You also have the following rights:

  • the right to request rectification of information that is inaccurate or out of date;
  • the right to erasure of your information (known as the "right to be forgotten");
  • the right to restrict the way in which we are using your information; and
  • the right to request that your information be provided to you in a format that is secure and suitable for re-use (known as the "right to portability");

All of these rights are subject to certain safeguards and limits or exemptions, further details of which can be found in our Data Protection Policy.  To exercise any of these rights, you should contact our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above.

If you are not happy with the way in which we have processed or dealt with your information, you can complain to the Information Commissioner's Office.  Further details about how to complain can be found at https://www.dataprotection.ie/docs/Making-a-Complaint-to-the-Data-Protection-Commissioner/r/18.htm

CHANGES TO THIS PRIVACY POLICY

This policy was last updated in March 2018.  We may amend this policy from time to time to take account of changes to our processes or changes to data protection or other legislation.  If we make any significant changes to this policy we will show this clearly on our website, in our publications such as Connected or by writing to you directly.  By continuing to use our website you will be deemed to have accepted these changes.

1 day ago

Saturday 15th June

Obstacles to new believers

“Again Jesus spoke to them, saying, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” John 8:12

In Islam, there are 99 names for Allah, but “father” is not a...

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2 days ago

Friday 14th June

Bedouin of the Arabian Peninsula

The Arabian Peninsula Bedouin are no longer moving their tents and herds of camels with the rain. Almost all have moved into some sort of fixed building, often with government help. Some have moved to the big cities and only go back...

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3 days ago

Thursday 13th June

Bedouin tribes in Jordan in the Middle East

The Bedouin tribes of Jordan consist of around half a million people living in the rural east and south of the country, known as the Badia area. Many seeds of the gospel have been sown among them over decades of faithfu...

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4 days ago

Wednesday 12th June

Testimony

Upon hearing the gospel, a Bedouin man could not get over the fact that God had sacrificed his own son for him. He stood up in front of a group of men and asked how many of them had sons. He exclaimed: “Would you give up your son for me?”
Read More

5 days ago

Tuesday 11th June

Bedouin tribes in Sinai in Egypt, North Africa

You may hear about North Sinai in the news as a haven for terrorists and where the persecution of Christians is commonplace. However, there are also many Bedouin tribes seeking to live a peaceful life in the land. Read More

6 days ago

Monday 10th June

Who are the Arab Bedouins?

Bedouin are traditionally shepherds, keeping camels, goats or sheep. However, they are increasingly exchanging the tent for permanent settlement, due to changing economic and social circumstances in the region, but many still keep a small...

Read More

1 day ago

Saturday 15th June

Obstacles to new believers

“Again Jesus spoke to them, saying, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” John 8:12

In Islam, there are 99 names for Allah, but “father” is not among them. The whole idea of a relational God is alien to Bedouins.

Bedouins will often point out just how much Muslims and Christians have in common. But the greatest stumbling block remains the cross. God’s divine plan of salvation to bring life through death, glory through humiliation, and victory through utter defeat is a notion that is alien to Muslim Bedouins. And yet, this wonderful truth has the power to transform their current and future destinies.

Another stumbling block is the fear of losing their belonging and identity in the tribe. Each Bedouin sees himself not as an individual, but as a part of the bigger collective of the tribe. In the tribe, each family member is traditionally bound by obligations of mutual assistance. Because of their strong group culture and need to conform, it is complicated for an individual to start following Jesus within their own tribe. This may lead to persecution with some facing death threats and banishment from the tribe and also the risk of losing their job and family.

Some known Bedouin believers live isolated lives, not integrated into fellowships of other believers. Because the Bedouin live in rural places, discipleship by mature believers from outside their communities is risky and logistically hard.

• Lord Jesus, strengthen new believers to hold fast to your Word, even in the face of persecution, that they may develop godly character.

• We pray the Bedouin will see, hear and understand the mystery of the cross so that they may turn to you, freely enter into your presence and receive your healing, joy and peace.

• Heavenly Father, we ask you to draw not just individuals to yourself, but whole families, that they may start following Jesus within their own tribe, transforming and redeeming their tribe from within, according to your purposes. Bless those who are persecuted out of their tribes, that they may find their identity and security in you.

• Lord, bring a huge harvest among the Bedouin! Stir up movements for Jesus in many places and tribes. Make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.

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2 days ago

Friday 14th June

Bedouin of the Arabian Peninsula

The Arabian Peninsula Bedouin are no longer moving their tents and herds of camels with the rain. Almost all have moved into some sort of fixed building, often with government help. Some have moved to the big cities and only go back ‘home’ during Eid festivals or weddings or to visit a sick relative. Others go out almost every weekend and are still attached to their desert lifestyle and herds of camels. Most have a Sudanese or Pakistani to shepherd their camels.

Only a few cross-cultural workers are living in close proximity with the Bedouin communities throughout the Gulf. Many more workers are needed in their city neighbourhoods and out in the thousands of villages.

• Father, we ask you to bless the Bedouin in the Arabian Peninsula and for more workers to move into their neighbourhoods as a witness.

• We ask you to show your greatness and holiness to these Bedouin tribes, and make yourself known to them, so that they will know that you are Lord. We then ask that they will go back to their villages as ambassadors for your Kingdom.

“So I will show my greatness and my holiness and make myself known in the eyes of many nations. Then they will know that I am the Lord.” Ezekiel 38:23

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3 days ago

Thursday 13th June

Bedouin tribes in Jordan in the Middle East

The Bedouin tribes of Jordan consist of around half a million people living in the rural east and south of the country, known as the Badia area. Many seeds of the gospel have been sown among them over decades of faithful witness, but few believers are known among them. They are hard to reach in faraway rural areas.

The Zuwayda tribe live in the rural south of Jordan in the beautiful Wadi Rum area. They are Muslims but used to be a Christian tribe a long time ago. They converted to Islam when they were stricken with poverty and were no longer able to pay the Islamic tax for unbelievers. To this day, they mark their camels with crosses.

The Ghayath tribe live in the north-eastern part of Jordan, close to the Iraqi border. Most of them don’t have citizenship and many are very poor. Due to lack of job opportunities many of the men are involved in the smuggling of drugs and are looked down upon by other Bedouins.

• Lord we ask that you redeem the Ghayath tribe and use them to bless the other tribes, just like you did with Gideon. We ask you to free them from the bondage of drug addiction and smuggling and that they would instead take the gospel to unreached places.

• Pray that the cross may make its way into the hearts of the Zuwayda again. Let’s ask God to bring the Zuwayda back under His wings, put His laws into their hearts and write them on their minds, that they may be His people once again.

• Lord, let there be a breakthrough among the Bedouin tribes of Jordan, leading to a movement among them. Send more workers to live and witness amongst them. Bring forth your blessings to the Bedouin like rivers in the desert.

“This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, declares the Lord: I will put my laws on their hearts, and write them on their minds.” Hebrews 10:16

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4 days ago

Wednesday 12th June

Testimony

Upon hearing the gospel, a Bedouin man could not get over the fact that God had sacrificed his own son for him. He stood up in front of a group of men and asked how many of them had sons. He exclaimed: “Would you give up your son for me?”

He went on to tell them that he had committed a murder and now needed someone to take his place in order to make amends. The other men started shouting, “Don’t give him your son, he’s not worth it!” Some were willing, however, to offer him blood money instead.

Blood feuds are still normal among Bedouins, and when someone is killed, a ransom needs to be paid.

After an animated discussion, the man finally explained that he had not committed a murder but wanted to illustrate to them how amazing it was that God Almighty gave his own son to pay for the sin of another.

This illiterate Bedouin had understood the core message of salvation through listening to an audio Bible.

Listen to a beautiful worship song by Andrew Peterson called Is He Worthy? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIahc83Kvp4

• Father, we praise you that your Word is available in audio format for the many illiterate Bedouin and ask that many more come to see you as the ransom for their sin and shame.

• Many Muslims throughout the world are being drawn to faith in Christ through dreams and visions, often of a man with a shining face and a shining robe calling to them. Pray that God will give dreams of Christ to the Bedouin tribes scattered throughout the Middle East and North Africa and visions to draw them to Himself.

• Ask for the Bedouins to have a revelation of the truth, that Jesus purchased their life by His death on the cross.

“And they sang a new song, saying: ‘You are worthy to take the scroll and to open its seals, because you were slain, and with your blood you purchased for God persons from every tribe and language and people and nation.” Revelation 5:9

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5 days ago

Tuesday 11th June

Bedouin tribes in Sinai in Egypt, North Africa

You may hear about North Sinai in the news as a haven for terrorists and where the persecution of Christians is commonplace. However, there are also many Bedouin tribes seeking to live a peaceful life in the land.

The Tarabin are a tribe that live primarily in the town of Nuweiba and surrounding desert villages in the eastern part of the Sinai Peninsula. The men work in tourism as desert guides or as fishermen. The women make beautiful jewellery.

South Sinai is a mountainous desert region with only a few springs of water here and there. It is famous for Mount Sinai as well as for the Red Sea coast and lush coral reefs. The Bedouins have lived in the region for several hundred years and have recently settled into towns because of better work prospects. There are at least seven different tribes.

One of these is the Muzeina tribe. This tribe are the largest in South Sinai with families represented in most of the towns and villages. They are a generous people always ready to invite friends and strangers alike in for tea or a meal.

Another tribe is the Jabelaya. They live in the mountains and wadis surrounding Mt. Sinai, in and around the village of St. Katherine. Like the Tarabin, the men primarily work in tourism as hiking guides and the women do beautiful beading and embroidery. As tourism has decreased, they need more work opportunities for families and adequate health care.

• Pray that the Jabelaya will have the opportunity to hear God’s Word and will find all their needs are met in Him.

• Pray that the Muzeina will have open hearts to the Lord and that He will reveal himself to them through His word and through dreams and visions. May He draw many Muzeina to himself and to salvation in Jesus Christ.

• Pray for more field workers to bring the gospel to the Tarabin and that a movement towards Jesus will spread through them into Northern Sinai.

• There are currently no known field workers in North Sinai, in part due to the military prohibiting foreigners from entering. Pray for peace and hope to return to this region, so will be an open door for workers and that God will reveal himself to the people there in supernatural ways.

“And the LORD will guide you continually and satisfy your desire in scorched places and make your bones strong; and you shall be like a watered garden, like a spring of water, whose waters do not fail.” Isaiah 58:1

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6 days ago

Monday 10th June

Who are the Arab Bedouins?

Bedouin are traditionally shepherds, keeping camels, goats or sheep. However, they are increasingly exchanging the tent for permanent settlement, due to changing economic and social circumstances in the region, but many still keep a small flock of goats or sheep.

The word bedouin comes from the Arab word bedu which means desert dweller. Today they live in countries across North Africa and the Middle East.

They live in tight-knit communities, usually as part of the larger tribe to which they belong. Many are illiterate (this is especially true for the women), and their dialect is quite different from the surrounding urban dialects.

They are renowned for their loyalty, hospitality and generosity. It is a Bedouin’s most sacred duty to honour his guest in every way possible.

They are, however, almost completely unexposed to the gospel. Indeed, for centuries they have been largely ignored, with no witness to Christ amongst them whatsoever. Bedouins are proud Muslims. The first converts to Islam came from the Bedouin tribes living in and around Mecca. Islam has become embedded and deeply rooted in Bedouin culture. Bedouins also believe very strongly in demons called jinn or genie. They believe that demons hide in bathrooms and caves protecting buried treasure. Bedouins will mumble the name of God before entering a tent, a room or a car and also before eating, drinking or performing any task. This is thought to ward off evil spirits. Bedouins will visit “witch doctors” for many problems, hoping the séances and charms will help them.

But praise God, momentum is building for a wonderful breakthrough among the Bedouin. A little spring is starting to burst forth, which we want to see turn into a mighty river of blessing in the desert areas of the Middle East and North Africa.
• Lord, we pray for movements to sweep through all the Bedouin tribes across North Africa and the Middle East, expanding the Kingdom and seeing transformation in their communities.

• Heavenly Father, we ask that the Bedouin across the Middle East and North Africa will come to know Jesus as the Good Shepherd who laid down his life for them, that they will learn to know his voice and follow him.

• Father, we ask that you would send out more workers amongst the Bedouin peoples and work in the hearts of your people to move them to love these tribes and see Christ declared and followed in their midst.
“Behold, I am doing a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.” Isaiah 43:19

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Obstacles to new believers

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