Frontiers is committed to respecting and protecting your privacy.  For the purposes of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and any subsequent UK legislation covering data protection the Data Controller is Frontiers.  The person responsible for data protection in the organisation is the Data Protection Co-ordinator.  If you have any questions about this Policy or concerning your personal information held by Frontiers please:-

Call us on: 0303 333 5051

Email us: data-requests@frontiers.org.uk

Write to us: Frontiers, PO Box 1445, High Wycombe, HP12 9BU

This Policy sets out why we collect personal information about individuals and how we use that information.  It describes the legal basis for this and explains the rights you have over the way your information is used.

WHAT INFORMATION WE COLLECT

We collect information:

  • When you give it to us directly

We collect personal information, including your name and contact details, each time you deal with us.  For example, when you make a donation, request materials or information, sign up for an event, complete an application form to work with us, volunteer or contact us for any other reason.

  • When you use our website

We collect non-personal data such as IP addresses, details of pages visited and files downloaded.  Website information is collected using cookies, see the section on Cookies below.

  • When it is available on social media

We may collect information you make available on, for example, Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.  You may wish to check their privacy policies to find out more information about how they process your data.

  • From publicly available data

We may collect information from Companies House, the Charities Commission and information published in articles, newspapers or blogs.

  • Indirectly from third parties

We may collect information from third parties, such as event organisers or referees for applications, where you have given your consent.  You may wish to check their privacy policies to find out more information about how they process your data.

HOW WE USE YOUR INFORMATION

We may use your personal information to:

  • Provide information or services you have requested
  • Keep you up to date on news and stories about our mission and events
  • Process donations you give us, including gift aid
  • Keep records of your relationship with us, e.g. questions you have asked or complaints you have made
  • Organise volunteering activities you have told us you would like to be involved with
  • Seek your views on services or activities we provide so we can make improvements
  • Maintain our organisational records and ensure we know how you prefer to be contacted
  • Process applications for work or ministry, either in the UK or overseas.

OUR LEGAL BASIS FOR PROCESSING YOUR INFORMATION

The use of your information for the purposes set out above is lawful because one or more of the following applies:

  • Consent

Where you have provided information to us for the purposes of requesting information, working with us, or that we carry out a service for you, we will proceed on the basis that you have given consent to us using the information for that purpose.  You may withdraw consent at any time by emailing us at the email address above.  This will not affect the lawfulness of processing of your information prior to your withdrawal of consent being received and actioned.

  • Legitimate interest

Where you have previously requested information, services or events, we may contact you again if similar new information, services or events become available that might be of interest to you.  Where you have previously made a donation, we may continue to send you information about the work your donation has made possible or other work we wish to undertake.  Where you have previously asked us not to contact you in a particular way we will continue to respect your preferences.  You can change your contact preferences at any time or object to us processing your data by contacting us by telephone, post or email as shown above

  • Legal obligations

We may need to process or retain certain information from you to fulfil our duties under UK law, for example for audit, tax and gift aid purposes.

HOW WE KEEP YOUR INFORMATION SAFE

We have controls in place to protect any personal data you provide.  For example, online forms are encrypted and our network is protected and routinely security checked.

Access to personal data is restricted only to those staff members whose job-roles require such access.  Suitable training is provided for all our staff.

However, no data transmission over the internet can be guaranteed to be 100% secure.  While we strive to safeguard your information, we cannot guarantee the security of any information you provide online and you do this at your own risk.

We use cloud-based systems to process data and therefore data may be processed outside of the European Economic Area (EEA).  We adopt the Information Commissioners approved measures and therefore ensure that personal data is held in compliance with European data protection regulations.  We take all reasonable steps to ensure that your data is stored and processed securely in accordance with this policy.  By submitting your personal data you agree to this transfer, storing and processing of your information.

HOW LONG WE KEEP YOUR INFORMATION

We will keep your personal information only as long as it is necessary for the relevant activity.  We have a Records Retention Policy to implement this, which takes account of our legal, accounting and tax obligations, as well as considering what would be reasonable for each activity.  For example, we may retain details of donations for seven years to meet tax and accounting requirements, but keep sensitive medical personal information provided for a short-term overseas trip only until that trip is completed.  If you have any questions about our Records Retention Policy, please contact our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above

WHEN WE SHARE YOUR INFORMATION

  • A few third parties provide services for us, for example sending mail and processing donations.  We select these service providers with care, share only the information necessary to provide the relevant service and have agreements in place requiring them to operate with the same care over data protection as ourselves.
  • We occasionally share information with third parties when running joint events with them.  We will let you know if any data might be shared when you register for an event.
  • Should you apply to travel overseas with us, we may share personal information with partners in overseas locations.  This may include sensitive personal data such as medical information.  We will obtain your consent before any data is transferred.
  • We may also disclose your personal information if required to do so by a legal obligation, or for the purposes of fraud prevention, or where doing so would not infringe your rights, but is necessary and in the public interest.  Otherwise we will not share your information with other organisations without your consent.

COOKIES

What are Cookies?
A cookie is a text file sent from our website as soon as you visit the site.  It is stored on your computer's hard drive and helps us to identify your computer (not you) and collects information in an aggregate, anonymous way.

Cookies may be used to collect information about your visit to our website, for example, traffic data, location data, device information, date and time, and pages you visit.

The use of cookies is an industry standard for most major websites.  You can find more information about cookies by follow these two links - http://www.allaboutcookies.org/ or https://www.aboutcookies.org/

Our use of cookies on our website
To enjoy our website to the full, we recommend that you leave cookies turned on.  If you turn off cookies then you may not be able to access parts of the site.

The cookie data we collect may be used to:

  • Customise our website's content and help our visitors' current and future needs
  • Process any requests, applications or transactions you may make
  • Aid our internal administration and analysis

Managing cookies
 Most browsers allow you to turn off the cookie function.  To do this you can look at the help function on your browser.

Third party cookies
We work with several third party suppliers who set cookies on our website to enable them to provide us with services.  These are mainly used for reporting and to help improve the way we communicate.

We use websites such as YouTube to embed videos and you may be sent cookies from these websites.  We do not control the setting of these cookies, so we suggest you check third party websites for more information about their cookies and how to manage them.

We also use third party suppliers such as Google Analytics who may also use cookies.  They may also use tracking pixels, which are commonly found in advertising to track the effectiveness of adverts.

As some of these services may be based outside of the UK and the European Union, they may not fall under UK legislation.  If you are concerned about this, you can change your cookie settings (see above) and can find more information about this here - https://ico.org.uk/

YOUR CHOICES AND TELLING US WHEN THINGS CHANGE

 Preferences
You can change your preferences on what you receive from us or how we contact you, by contacting our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above.

Updating your details
We do appreciate it if you keep your details up to date.  You can do so in the same way as updating your preferences (above).

We may use Post Office address search, postcode lists or other sources to confirm data that you provide us with if, for example, we are unsure of what you have completed on a form.

We will not use these sources to create data that you have chosen not to provide, for example, if you have left a telephone number blank; nor will we automatically update changes of address, we will normally only update your address when you tell us it's changed.  However, if you are a regular giver and mail is returned to us, we may use external sources to update your address details to enable us to inform you on how your money is being spent.

YOUR RIGHTS

You have the right to request details of the processing activities that we carry out with your personal information through making a Subject Access Request.  Such requests have to be made in writing and exceptionally may be subject to a charge.  More details about how to make a request, and the procedure to be followed, can be found in our Data Protection Policy.  To make a request contact us at data-requests@frontiers.org.uk

You also have the following rights:

  • the right to request rectification of information that is inaccurate or out of date;
  • the right to erasure of your information (known as the "right to be forgotten");
  • the right to restrict the way in which we are using your information; and
  • the right to request that your information be provided to you in a format that is secure and suitable for re-use (known as the "right to portability");

All of these rights are subject to certain safeguards and limits or exemptions, further details of which can be found in our Data Protection Policy.  To exercise any of these rights, you should contact our Data Protection Co-ordinator as above.

If you are not happy with the way in which we have processed or dealt with your information, you can complain to the Information Commissioner's Office.  Further details about how to complain can be found at https://www.dataprotection.ie/docs/Making-a-Complaint-to-the-Data-Protection-Commissioner/r/18.htm

CHANGES TO THIS PRIVACY POLICY

This policy was last updated in March 2018.  We may amend this policy from time to time to take account of changes to our processes or changes to data protection or other legislation.  If we make any significant changes to this policy we will show this clearly on our website, in our publications such as Connected or by writing to you directly.  By continuing to use our website you will be deemed to have accepted these changes.

14 hours ago

Friday 16th November

Gorontalo people – an unreached people group Pop: 1 Million Muslim: 98%

Among over 1 million Gorontalo in Sulawesi, there are believed to be only about 3,200 followers of Christ. This people group live in the northern part of the island, in an area made up o...

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1 day ago

Thursday 15th November

The Bugis – an unreached people group Pop: >5 million Muslim: 99%

The Bugis are the dominant people group in Sulawesi. They number over five million and live mainly in the south of the island.

They make their living by hunting, fishing, farming,...

Read More

2 days ago

Wednesday 14th November

Los Pueblos Abandonados – written by a Frontiers worker

I asked a Spanish-speaking friend, “What’s the word for ‘unengaged peoples’ in Spanish?”

What he said went right to my heart.

“Los pueblos abandonados,” he said, which ...

Read More

3 days ago

Tuesday 13th November

Recent earthquake and tsunami

There are several large islands in Indonesia, including Sulawesi, which is the world’s eleventh largest island. This was where the recent earthquake struck on the 28th of September.

The 7.5 magnitude earthquake triggere...

Read More

4 days ago

Monday 12th November

Introducing Indonesia Pop: 260 million Muslim: 215 million (83%)

With thousands of islands, Indonesia is a unique and fascinating archipelago situated between Australia and mainland Asia. Indonesia draws tourists in their millions each year and has generated ...

Read More

6 days ago

Saturday 10th November

Tragedies and miracles – a story from a Southeast Asian country
A small path leads to the hut that was built to give shelter to a small family: Faadl and Elmas who are 14 and 16 years old, their mother and little Hasuma who is 3 years old. The house has a big li...

Read More

14 hours ago

Friday 16th November

Gorontalo people – an unreached people group Pop: 1 Million Muslim: 98%

Among over 1 million Gorontalo in Sulawesi, there are believed to be only about 3,200 followers of Christ. This people group live in the northern part of the island, in an area made up of extensive coastlines, rugged mountains and a large central valley with a beautiful lake at its centre.

The Gorontalo have traditionally lived along the coast and in the fertile lowlands beside rivers and streams. They make their living by farming or fishing. Today quite a few are active in various businesses, from selling used clothing in the marketplace to running national companies. A number are powerful national figures.

The Gorontalo have been Muslim since the 16th century. They observe Friday prayers with colleagues from work. Many residents also walk to their neighbourhood mosque for evening prayers. Each village has one to three mosques.

Despite being strongly Islamic, many Gorontalo still believe in motolohuta (supernatural creatures) and hulobalangi (mysterious powers) of which they are both fearful and fascinated. Others believe that the graves of people who possessed supernatural power in ancient days are sacred.

Yet their beliefs do not bring them the life they so desire. Perhaps this is illustrated by a story published by Global Prayer Digest about Jawaria, a Gorontalo woman and a faithful follower of Islam. She was introduced to Ati who followed Jesus and was radically different from anyone else Jawaria had ever known. Ati trained Jawaria to take selected Bible stories, one at a time, and then discuss them with her household.

As Jawaria honestly thought about her life, she realised she had many unmet needs. She felt like one who had been invited to know Allah and yet was always separated by a great chasm between herself and a holy and just God. She wondered if the stories in the Bible held the answer.

• Pray for those such as Jawaria who have studied the Bible, but are torn between their long-held Islamic beliefs and the truth of the Word of God. Let’s pray the veil is removed and they can begin a life-giving relationship with our good and loving Father.

• We praise God for bold and faithful workers such as Ati and yet we know so many more workers are needed. Please pray to God to move people’s hearts to go to these unreached people.

• Pray for the church-planting efforts among the Gorontalo so many may find God’s true and straight pathway found in Jesus alone.

Sources: https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/11931/ID
http://www.globalprayerdigest.org/issue/day/2013/06/27

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1 day ago

Thursday 15th November

The Bugis – an unreached people group Pop: >5 million Muslim: 99%

The Bugis are the dominant people group in Sulawesi. They number over five million and live mainly in the south of the island.

They make their living by hunting, fishing, farming, raising livestock or making handicrafts. Those who live in the mountains make their livelihood as farmers and those living along the coastal regions usually work as fishermen. They are known for their craftsmanship in boat-building. However, many Bugis have left their home area to seek success and wealth and have moved to other large Indonesian islands and nearby Malaysia.

Two of the most important cultural values for Bugis are siri (personal honour) and siri-pesse (communal honour). A person must defend, maintain and build his own siri. If a person’s siri is offended, serious forms of revenge may follow.

The Bugis believe very strongly that certain days are special, with good fortune for events and activities held on the first Wednesday and last Thursday of each month. Conversely, they consider Saturday to be a bad day and more likely to bring misfortune.

The Bugis are well known for their fervent adherence to Sunni Islam. Global Prayer Digest reported how this has led to hostility towards Christianity, so few Christian workers have persevered in reaching them. While on a prayer drive a few years ago, church-planting mission teams realised how crucial prayer was to begin reaching people. Even so, after two years of sharing Christ, follow up and prayer, only one household had become believers. Three other households had received Christ through this network, bringing the total to seventeen people that came to the Light. There are only approximately ten known Bugis churches, and they are presently not reproducing.

Prayer is a key to breaking spiritual strongholds and rescuing people from the kingdom of darkness and bringing them into the Kingdom of Light.

• Let’s pray that the eyes of the Bugis will be opened to see Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour.

• Since we know that prayer is crucial in preparing hearts to receive Christ, let’s cry out to God for many Bugis households to turn from the strongholds of Islam to freedom in Christ.

• Pray for workers who are willing to persevere in this hostile environment.
Do you know? The origin of the name ‘bogeyman’? During the Spice Islands trade of centuries ago, the Bugis people were known as marauding sea-faring pirates. Parents would tell their children that they must behave or they would be given over to the ‘bogeyman.’

Sources: http://www.globalprayerdigest.org/issue/day/2014/06/27

http://www.prayingforindonesia.com/the-islands-of-indonesia/sulawesi/

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2 days ago

Wednesday 14th November

Los Pueblos Abandonados – written by a Frontiers worker

I asked a Spanish-speaking friend, “What’s the word for ‘unengaged peoples’ in Spanish?”

What he said went right to my heart.

“Los pueblos abandonados,” he said, which means the abandoned people.

Does your heart cry out for los abandonados?

There are enough workers in the eminently liveable cities of London and Vienna, Istanbul and Amman! There must be more courageous Christians who want to go where there is no path, where no footsteps have gone ahead, where there are no pins in the missions map.

The places where some of the pueblos abandonados live are among the 17 million Indonesians on the island of Sulawesi.

Official statistics put the Muslim population there at just over 96%, with Protestant and Catholic Christians numbering just above 2%. This is where more workers are needed in Indonesia to bring the good news of the gospel and even more so following the recent tragic events we read about yesterday.

• Pray for the Holy Spirit to open doors and create opportunities for the gospel in the lives of individuals, families, villages and communities in Sulawesi.

• Pray for more labourers to go and live and represent our Lord Jesus Christ in Sulawesi.

• Pray that churches across the world would be moved by the numbers of ‘abandoned people’ in Sulawesi yet to meet Jesus, and that they would become sending churches.
“How then will they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone preaching?” (Romans 10:14)

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3 days ago

Tuesday 13th November

Recent earthquake and tsunami

There are several large islands in Indonesia, including Sulawesi, which is the world’s eleventh largest island. This was where the recent earthquake struck on the 28th of September.

The 7.5 magnitude earthquake triggered a devastating 3 metre high tsunami, which together has led to over 1,950 deaths and injuries to more than 2,300 people. Over 5,000 people are reported missing and over 62,000 internally displaced.

Palu in Central Sulawesi on the west coast was the hardest hit city as this was where the tsunami came into the bay and destroyed many surrounding towns and villages. Thousands of homes, hotels, shopping centres and several mosques were destroyed. There are over 2.4 million people affected and over 16,000 in Palu city alone were displaced. The tsunami also came into the beach area of Donggala about an hour north of Palu on the west coast, causing huge devastation there. Rivers of soil swept away entire neighbourhoods in this whole area.

The central part of the island is very mountainous, meaning the peninsulas are remote from each other. This geography, combined with collapsed infrastructure, cracked roads and loss of power lines makes communication and reaching those affected on the island very difficult.

This was the second earthquake in two months to hit Indonesia and claim hundreds of lives.

International aid of food, water and medical supplies has helped, but many are now left to try to come to terms with the loss of their loved ones, their homes and their livelihoods.

• Let’s pray for the people of Indonesia and particularly of Sulawesi as they come to terms with this disaster and try to rebuild their lives.

• Pray for God’s saving grace for those who do not yet know Him and let’s pray that through this disaster, Muslims will come to find the One who is dependable.
“And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock.” Matt 7:25

• We thank God for all those involved in the continued coordination of rescue and relief efforts. Pray these efforts will be efficiently and safely carried out and through this people will see the love of Jesus.

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4 days ago

Monday 12th November

Introducing Indonesia Pop: 260 million Muslim: 215 million (83%)

With thousands of islands, Indonesia is a unique and fascinating archipelago situated between Australia and mainland Asia. Indonesia draws tourists in their millions each year and has generated a great deal of scientific interest in its natural marvels and plethora of plant and animal species. For a single country it boasts the most incredible array of peoples, cultures and biodiversity; one that you might expect from several different nations combined.

The fact that Indonesia is home to the world’s largest Muslim population originates from Arab settlement on the islands back in the 4th century. Islamic influence grew with the birth of Islam a few centuries later - often melding with Indonesian spiritual traditions. European conquest is believed to have catalysed this growth, as Indonesians sought to oppose Westerners’ presence by adopting stronger Islamic values. Islam now plays a significant role in Indonesian life; notably in government, politics and spiritual practices.

Following Indonesia’s independence from the Dutch in 1949, the church suffered persecution from the country’s second president, Suharto, and his government. Evangelism was hugely restricted during this time, leaving the church unprepared for the task of sharing the gospel with its Muslim neighbours when Suharto’s leadership ended in 1998. Indonesia is now developing a greater openness to other faiths, which is creating new opportunities for gospel witness.

The effort of long-term workers in Indonesia is playing a significant role. Over the years, many of these workers have seen fruit in working in partnership with Indonesian believers to develop their hearts for the unreached Muslim peoples around them. Today Indonesia is seeing large movements of Muslims coming to faith. Almost all are being led by local believers... and sometimes believers who were led to faith by foreign workers. There’s something exciting happening; kingdom growth amongst Muslims in Indonesia is greater than has been seen in any other area of the world.

However, nearly 182 million people live within people groups that have no access to the good news. There is an immense task ahead in Indonesia - for the existing church, for the body of new believers and for those who come alongside to envision and disciple them. Most unreached peoples are found in villages and rural areas, and more intentional effort is needed to cross the cultural and physical divides in order for them to hear the good news of Jesus. Time, patience and investment in relationships are then essential to seeing long term impacts of God’s love in each of these communities.

We are now at a key time for more workers to both pioneer, and continue mobilising and joining in with the efforts of local churches. With more discipleship of indigenous believers, raising up of visionary leaders and more workers sent to places where the gospel hasn’t gone before, we can believe for many more to turn to the Saviour.

• Pray for the effectiveness of the Word of God as it is distributed throughout the region and as Muslims read it for the very first time.

• Ask for revival among national believers and that they would share their faith with their Muslim neighbours.

• Islamic practice there is steeped in folk traditions. Ask God to help workers discover how to share His infinite love and power with Muslims.

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6 days ago

Saturday 10th November

Tragedies and miracles – a story from a Southeast Asian country
A small path leads to the hut that was built to give shelter to a small family: Faadl and Elmas who are 14 and 16 years old, their mother and little Hasuma who is 3 years old. The house has a big living area and a few smaller rooms for kitchen and sleeping areas, one for mum and the baby, one for the two boys and a third one for the uncle who moved in after their father’s death.

Faadl shares what happened on the day his father died. He was on the way to sell chickens. This was the business he set up after he fled from Myanmar with his wife and Faadl as a baby. He worked hard to buy chickens, feed them and sell them to costumers in the surrounding villages and town areas. He did that using his motor bike. He was able to earn a little money – at least enough to provide for his family, always fearing that the police could arrest him anytime. As a refugee in this country he wasn’t allowed to work at all.

There were troubles with the local community. They didn’t like the business. The chickens were smelly and noisy, especially when preparing them for selling. And some neighbours were jealous. Therefore Faadl’s father searched for an area cheap enough to rent or buy something and to use for his chicken business. He couldn’t find anything, until he found the swampland in between the railroad and the barbwire wall. The house he built was simple, yet big enough to hold the whole family and guarantee a safe home, at least when it didn’t rain much.

The day when the accident happened, Faadl’s father had left the house to sell some chickens. He had to stop at one of the main roads, but needed to cross it in order to deliver a few of his chickens. Nobody exactly knows what happened but a lorry driver didn’t see him and the father of three was hit. He died on the spot. With tear-filled eyes and a sense of hopelessness, Faadl ends his story.

Almost a year after this tragedy Faadl and Elmas are struggling to keep up the business and pursue their education in a nearby refugee school. They go to school in the morning and sell chickens in the afternoon. Faadl is at breaking point because of the immense responsibility he has to carry. Being the eldest son, he is eager to provide for his family. But he cannot go as far as his hardworking father could; he cannot use the bike to deliver chicken, since he doesn’t own a license. If the police catch him and send him into detention, nobody would be able to provide for the family anymore.

Hopeless, abandoned, futureless Faadl and Elmas are devastated. And so is their mum. Following Rohingya culture, her husband used to do every work outside the house for her. Now she has to go shopping, not able to speak the local language, since she didn’t have to leave the house before. The uncle (her brother) moved in after the accident and tries his best to support the family wherever possible.

When a flood hit the state, thousands were affected. A lot of Rohingya lost their possessions, among them Faadl and Elmas’ family. During the flood, water rose so high inside the house that they could only stay in the highest area on a small platform. The school closed for a few days, because the students weren’t able to attend school. Two trees were uprooted during the heavy storm and rain. A third tree that would have hit and destroyed their house did not fall. After the flood the situation improved, with support from the school and other people. They were able to renovate the house a little.

Hope arose. They also started seeing a white man walking through their dreams. They haven’t understood the significance of this yet. In front of their house one of the trees that was uprooted has started growing again and is now bearing new branches with green leaves as before. They are surrounded by miracles. We thank God for His protection during the flood and for sparing their house from being destroyed.

• Ask God to reveal himself that they might see his glory and ultimately encounter “Isa Al-Masih” as the Rohingya call Jesus.

• Ask God to give strength to bear daily life with all the pain and suffering this family and two boys have to go through.

• Ask God for a revelation of His father heart, that He might become their peace, hope and future.

Source: https://www.pray4rohingya.org/prayer-story-27-tragedy-and-miracles/

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Bathtubs and Ballroom Dancing Overlay

Bathtubs and Ballroom Dancing 5th Nov 2018

Here are a few of the stranger ways my team has seen our creative God at work in the lives of our Muslim friends on the field.

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Pray Now Overlay

Pray Now

Friday 16th November

Gorontalo people – an unreached people group Pop: 1 Million Muslim: 98%

Among over 1 million Gorontalo in Sulawesi, there are believed to be only about 3,200 ...

Pray Now
Islam: Getting to the Heart Overlay 02 Dec 2018 08 Dec 2018
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Islam: Getting to the Heart

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