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Communities surrendered to Jesus

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Multiplying among all Muslim peoples

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Prioritising those with least access to the gospel

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9 hours ago

Wednesday 19th September

Samson was a Muslim Background Believer (MBB) who had come to faith about five years ago. He had previously been a cattle rustler and was feared around the region for his skills at lying, cheating and killing.

He had a dramatic conversion and not only repe...

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1 day ago

Tuesday 18th September

Fulani of West Africa

The following account (to be continued throughout the week) is from a Frontiers worker in West Africa:

Family life among the Fulani is very different from a typical western family life. It's very common for men to have up to 4 w...

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2 days ago

Monday 17th September

Fulani Pop: 40 million Islam 99.5%

The Fulani people are the largest nomadic people group in the world and probably the largest unreached people group in Africa. They number around 40 million, stretching all the way from the eastern part of Africa to the w...

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4 days ago

Saturday 15th September

Niger and its Hausa people Pop: 22 million Muslim: 97%

Niger lies on Nigeria’s northern border. The country's predominantly Islamic population of about 22 million mostly lives in the far south and west of the country. 97% of the nation is Muslim. 76% of t...

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5 days ago

Friday 14th September

Hausa of Nigeria Pop: 30.8 million Muslim: 99%

The Hausa are one of the 18% of Nigeria’s people groups that remain unreached. The Joshua Project records that 99.9% of Hausa people are Muslim, with virtually no believers and no evident movement to Jesus.
...

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6 days ago

A Country Divided Along Religious Lines

Boko Haram, (meaning ‘Western education is forbidden’), is a radical Islamic terrorist organization which started in 2002 as a moderate group with an operational base in northeastern Nigeria.
In July 2009, its founder and spiritual leader, Moh...

Read More

9 hours ago

Wednesday 19th September

Samson was a Muslim Background Believer (MBB) who had come to faith about five years ago. He had previously been a cattle rustler and was feared around the region for his skills at lying, cheating and killing.

He had a dramatic conversion and not only repented from his past sins but repaid all that he had unrightfully taken. However, Samson struggled to find work. He was a father of four children, lived in a small remote village and also was responsible for his aging parents and a blind older brother.

When people heard of his new faith, he was ostracised and finding employment was difficult for him. Samson came to our town to look for work. The phone rang just as we sat down for dinner. It was Samson's rich uncle calling him from the village.

"Deny Jesus, and I'll give you 40 cows.” (the equivalent of approximately £10,000)

A tear fell from Samson's eye. "I cannot, Uncle. I cannot." He hung up the phone.

MBBs like Samson face many challenges. They can struggle to find work, face ostracism, suffer from depression and often loneliness. They need to know Christ as Brother, God as their Father, the fellowship of the Spirit and the community of believers around them and throughout the world.

• Pray for strength and support for Muslim background believers like Samson, who count the cost of following Jesus. Pray they would know God’s favour and friendship is far greater than any loss they could experience.

• Pray that God will continue to work in communities and Fulani people will not be afraid to follow Jesus.

• Pray for workers as they seek to be the Fulanis’ brothers and sisters in Christ.

• In August, Pray Africa asked for prayer for some Fulani believers who had expressed interest and even belief, but who had not as yet had the boldness to identify themselves as followers of Jesus. Let’s pray that will be filled with boldness by the power of Holy Spirit, just like the believers at Pentecost.

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1 day ago

Tuesday 18th September

Fulani of West Africa

The following account (to be continued throughout the week) is from a Frontiers worker in West Africa:

Family life among the Fulani is very different from a typical western family life. It's very common for men to have up to 4 wives, though usually 2 or 3 is more common, and also to have many children. Marriage is supposed to be more of a ‘contract’ for the purpose of having children and giving social status.

In the villages and in more traditional families, sons who get married, will along with their new wife, continue to live in community with their parents. Daughters who marry typically move away to join their husband’s family, though their primary loyalty remains to their father even after they are married. Boys and girls can get married at a very young age, even as young as 12 or 13 years old.

Cousins often call each other ‘brother and sister’ and children often call uncles and aunts ‘mothers and fathers’. There is a community value in raising children and it's very rare that a father would discipline his own child. Usually that would be the uncles' job. It is often the women of the family that pass on the family traditions and religion. This is due to the absence of men, who either shepherd the herds or work in the bigger cities.

As we find ourselves living among the Fulani, we find ourselves asking God what a Jesus-believing Fulani family would look like. We long to see Fulani families come to taste and see the goodness of the Lord together.

• Pray for Fulani families to know God's truth that brings freedom.
“Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” John 8:32

• Pray it will be His power that is told to the next generation.
“Even when I am old and grey, do not forsake me, my God, till I declare your power to the next generation, your mighty acts to all who are to come.” Psalm 71:18

• Let’s pray for many Fulani families to know and see the goodness of the Lord.

“Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in him.” Ps 34:8

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2 days ago

Monday 17th September

Fulani Pop: 40 million Islam 99.5%

The Fulani people are the largest nomadic people group in the world and probably the largest unreached people group in Africa. They number around 40 million, stretching all the way from the eastern part of Africa to the west.

They have large populations in Nigeria, Guinea and Senegal. They are also live in Mauritania, Niger, Chad, Gambia, Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Mali and as far east as Sudan.

They work largely as cattle herders; their cattle are highly prized. The decreasing availability of land and drought has led to conflict with neighbouring farmers of different tribes.

Despite the diversity of culture among the Fulani, they all follow a code of conduct called ‘pulaaku’. These moral values can be summarised in four qualities: patience, wisdom, modesty and courage.

Africa Inland Mission have produced a 2-minute video on this people group: https://vimeo.com/243101308

There is a unique challenge in reaching the Fulani with the good news of Jesus because of their nomadic lifestyle. Currently there are a few groups of believers, but still very few compared to their total population.

Take a few minutes to meditate on the following Scriptures and then pray for the Fulani in light of them.

“After this I looked, and there before me was a great multitude that no one could count, from every nation, tribe, people and language, standing before the throne and before the Lamb.” Revelation 7:9

“All the ends of the earth will remember and turn to the Lord and all the families of the nations will bow down before him”. Psalm 22:27

• Let’s ask for a widespread move of God’s Spirit, with thousands and thousands of Fulani turning to Christ.

• Let’s pray for the Fulani to be brought into the light of God’s Kingdom.

• Let’s pray for more gospel workers to reach the Fulani with God’s blessing.
Source of some material: http://prayafrica.org/project/fulani-west-africa/

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4 days ago

Saturday 15th September

Niger and its Hausa people Pop: 22 million Muslim: 97%

Niger lies on Nigeria’s northern border. The country's predominantly Islamic population of about 22 million mostly lives in the far south and west of the country. 97% of the nation is Muslim. 76% of the population is listed as being in unreached people groups, which includes the Hausa people. Nearly half of Nigeriens is Hausa.

The majority of Hausa people have been Sunni Muslim since the 11th century. Today, many of the rural Hausa are only superficially Muslim and their religious practices have been mixed with local traditions. Many continue to practice their traditional religion, called Maguzawa, especially in remote locations. They believe in a variety of spirits, both good and bad. Traditional rituals include making sacrificial offerings to the spirits and to the spirit possessed. Most rituals are performed by family members, but specialists are called upon to cure diseases.

Poverty and illiteracy are severe limitations to reaching the people of Niger with the gospel. Niger is one of the least developed and poorest countries of the world. A majority of the population lives in rural areas and have little access to advanced education. As of 2015, 71.3% of Niger’s population could not read, one of the lowest literacy rates in the world.

Slavery is still practiced in isolated areas of the country. Nigerien children are trafficked for labour in gold mines, sexual exploitation and begging. Women are abducted and sold into domestic servitude or prostitution and young boys are kidnapped for work in stone quarries.

Prayercast have made a moving video of this country: https://vimeo.com/38104332

The cultural pressure to maintain the Islamic faith continues to hinder outreach efforts, though Muslim background believing pastors are beginning to lead in the fledgling church.

• Let’s pray for focused efforts to reach those under the age of 15 – almost half of the overall population of this country.

• Let’s pray for many more gospel workers to go to Niger to reach the Nigerien people, most of whom have not met a follower of Jesus.

• Let’s pray for God’s transforming power in this country, bringing change and prosperity to this land.

Did you know? Hausa Muslims are known for being hospitable to strangers. In the Hausa language, one word, bako, is used to define both the word "guest" and "stranger.”

Sources: http://www.prayercast.com/niger.html
https://joshuaproject.net/assets/media/handouts/the31.pdf

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5 days ago

Friday 14th September

Hausa of Nigeria Pop: 30.8 million Muslim: 99%

The Hausa are one of the 18% of Nigeria’s people groups that remain unreached. The Joshua Project records that 99.9% of Hausa people are Muslim, with virtually no believers and no evident movement to Jesus.

In April, Missionary Network News reported that World Mission recently sent 200 of their solar-powered audio Bibles, the Treasure, to the Hausa people in northern Nigeria. World Mission’s Greg Kelley said they found the Treasure had been incredibly well received; it was in their language and the people embraced it. This meant more than 28,000 Muslims heard the gospel for the first time.

The Hausa are the largest ethnic group in all of West Africa. Thirty percent of all Hausa can be found in the north and northwest regions of Nigeria, an area known as ‘Hausaland.’ This region covers 75,000 square miles and straddles the border of Nigeria and Niger. From 1890 to 1960, Hausaland was divided into two sovereign states under French and British rule. After 1960, one became the Federal Republic of Nigeria and the other the Republic of Niger.

The Hausa are one of the most historically grounded and largest civilisations in West Africa and are therefore very influential, both culturally and politically.

By 1500 AD, Islam had been introduced to the Hausa by traders. Many of the urban Hausa embraced it in the hope of enhancing their businesses. However, the villagers were not as receptive to this new religion. The Fulani seized political power from the Hausa in the early 1800’s through a series of holy wars. They then put pressure on the Hausa to undergo large scale conversion.

As Islam has been carried throughout West Africa by Hausa traders and priests, nearly everyone expects a Hausa to be Muslim. This could be one of the main reasons why the Hausa stay so resistant to the gospel and have difficulty leaving their Islamic faith. There is also a lot of prejudice against the Christians of southern Nigeria and there has been intense persecution of the Hausa Muslim background believers.

Kelley also shared that Muslims who choose to follow Jesus or even to simply listen to the gospel can be persecuted; many are forced from their villages and their families no longer accept them.

• Pray for the few followers of Jesus among the Hausa to be strengthened to stand firm in their faith and become effective and fruitful in sharing and discussing Bible stories with their own and other families.

• Pray for large numbers of Hausa to be won for Christ and for a movement to Jesus to multiply among Hausa families and communities.

• We thank God for the Bible that is available in the Hausa language. Pray that the Lord will give Hausa families teachable and understanding hearts.

Sources: https://joshuaproject.net/assets/media/handouts/the31.pdf
https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/12070/NI https://www.mnnonline.org/news/ministering-to-muslims-in-nigeria/

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6 days ago

A Country Divided Along Religious Lines

Boko Haram, (meaning ‘Western education is forbidden’), is a radical Islamic terrorist organization which started in 2002 as a moderate group with an operational base in northeastern Nigeria.
In July 2009, its founder and spiritual leader, Mohammed Yusuf was executed. This paved the way for his deputy, Abubakar Shekau, to assume a leadership role. It is believed this led to the radicalisation of this group.

Some people feel that the rise of Boko Haram may be attributed to the failure of the past President of Nigeria, Goodluck Ebele Jonathan and his government, who was perceived as too weak because of the way he handled the Boko Haram rebels.

Another factor that gave Boko Haram prominence was the number of supporters they had in Nigeria’s security apparatus. How they were able to infiltrate the rank and file of the army, police and secret service remains unknown. They frustrated attempts by the then government of Goodluck Jonathan to quash the group.

Since Muhammadu Buhari became president in 2015, Nigeria’s military campaign against Boko
Haram has been relatively successful in dislodging the group from the territories it had occupied
in northern parts of the country.

Politics and religion are blended into a dangerous mix. This group is never short of recruits. They target the growing number of street urchins in the north, many of them drug addicts and sex slaves. Kidnapped girls and women have also been used as suicide bombers.

• Pray for a spiritual revival in the northeast that will result in Muslims embracing Christ.

• Pray for God to visit members of Boko Haram, who see their actions as a service to God, in the same way that Saul of Tarsus once thought it was good to persecute Christians.
• Praise God for Muslims who have turned to Jesus. Let’s pray for spiritual transformation and revival in Nigeria.

Source: http://www.globalprayerdigest.org/issue/what-is-boko-haram/

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From Slave to Friend Overlay

From Slave to Friend 14th Sep 2018

Frontiers workers Nate and Amber had been praying for months, asking God to give them relationships with men and women who were spiritually hungry.

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Pray Now

Wednesday 19th September

Samson was a Muslim Background Believer (MBB) who had come to faith about five years ago. He had previously been a cattle rustler and was feared around the region for...

Pray Now
Breakthrough - Miraculous Disciple-Making Among Muslims Overlay 06 October 2018 10:00 - 15:30
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Breakthrough - Miraculous Disciple-Making Among Muslims

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