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7 hours ago

Wednesday 20th March

Vision for Sudan

In January this year, Mission Network News (MNN) reported on Vision2020 - a church planting movement that is sweeping the world. This involves ministries, churches and leaders partnering together in some of the hardest-to-reach countries in the...

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1 day ago

Tuesday 19th March

Sudan Pop: 42 million Muslim: 97%

Sudan is one of the poorest and least developed countries of the world. The majority of its inhabitants are dependent on farming and animal breeding for their livelihoods. For most of the Arab tribes, agriculture is the basis ...

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2 days ago

Introduction to Sudan, Chad and South Sudan Pop: 71 million Muslim: 72%

The countries of Sudan, Chad and South Sudan in Northeast Africa aren’t easy places to live in. The climate is harsh with hot summers and unpredictable rainfall. In this dry and dusty region, comforts are few and in m...

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4 days ago

Saturday 16th March

Milk and Honey – an article from a Frontiers worker in Northeast Africa

“Recently I sat in my teammate’s home, sharing a breakfast of spiced coffee and fried dough as we chatted about new friends, neighbourhood happenings and things we’ve been learning.<...

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5 days ago

Friday 15th March

Mushunguli People Pop: 41,000 Muslim: 99%

To say that the Mushungulis of Somalia have a difficult life would be an understatement.

The Mushunguli are said to have descended from fugitive slaves who escaped from their Somali masters in northeast Tanza...

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6 days ago

Thursday 14th March

Somalis Pop: 10.7 million Muslim: 99%

In Somalia, the largest ethnic group are the Somalis, making up 85% of the population. They range from well-to-do, educated urbanites to nomads struggling for the basic necessities such as water. The majority of the pop...

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7 hours ago

Wednesday 20th March

Vision for Sudan

In January this year, Mission Network News (MNN) reported on Vision2020 - a church planting movement that is sweeping the world. This involves ministries, churches and leaders partnering together in some of the hardest-to-reach countries in the world to build sustainable churches.

One of these countries is Sudan.

In 2012, President Omar al-Bashir said the next constitution would be ‘100% Islamic,’ as he sought to make the country a purely Islamic state. What followed over the next six years was a systemic wave of persecution that has led to the closures or demolitions of hundreds of churches, arrests of church leaders, detentions, beatings and death. In areas with ongoing conflict, Christians are attacked indiscriminately.

At the end of yesterday’s article, we read how many Muslims are turning to Christ in Sudan. A Christian worker who spoke to MNN confirms that God is moving there in big ways.

The church is visible and active in Sudan and brave Christian leaders are speaking out against the injustice and oppression. He said they have prayed for about 4,000 churches and small house groups to be planted there by the year 2020.

He believed this was only going to be possible by a supernatural move of God. As Christians, he said they have a powerful message of love and care and he sees it really touching the lives of people they meet. Many of them come to know Christ.

Tribes that have been closed off to the hope of Christ are now starting to question their beliefs after witnessing the violence done to others by extremists. They realise that this religion that they have is not the ‘real’ one. They’re still looking for another option.

He said “100% we are depending on God’s hand. Prayers can make a big difference, because really, we need God’s power backing us if we are going to see His fruit this year.”

He asked for prayer for the following:

• Pray for safety and angelic protection for workers while they are moving from place to place in Sudan.

• Pray for accommodation, transportation and equipment, because Sudan is a very large country for workers to cover.

• Let’s also pray for the big vision for Sudan to be realised and for many Muslims to come to know that there is another way; it is the way of life and peace.

Source: https://www.mnnonline.org/news/big-vision-for-sudan-in-2019/?utm_source=MNN+Weekly+Missions+Prayer+Requests&utm_campaign=cdaec1aadd-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_TEST&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e13bef42a6-cdaec1aadd-84402651

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1 day ago

Tuesday 19th March

Sudan Pop: 42 million Muslim: 97%

Sudan is one of the poorest and least developed countries of the world. The majority of its inhabitants are dependent on farming and animal breeding for their livelihoods. For most of the Arab tribes, agriculture is the basis of the economy. Sorghum and millet are their staple crops, along with watermelons, gourds, okra, sesame and cotton. They also raise cattle, sheep, goats and donkeys. Cheese and butter are made from the milk of both their cows and goats.

Not all of the Arab tribes are farmers. Some tribes, such as the Arab Midob and the Mongallese Arab, are nomadic herdsmen travelling from place to place with their herds of cattle and camels in search of better grazing lands. Other Arab tribes, such as the Hasania and Husseinat, have become successful businessmen and merchants in Sudan. These groups are heavily engaged in the commercial activities of the cities in their region.

Today, the majority of Sudan's inhabitants are Arab Sunni Muslims. With the death of Mohammed in 632 AD, Arabs spread from the desert pastures of Arabia and migrated to the lands to the east and west. They engaged with the local North African tribes and introduced them to Islam. As the ruling majority, their influence over law and government is strong.

Omar Hassan al-Bashir was elected president of Sudan 1996 and has been re-elected several times since. He has been a strong and harsh ruler and is now facing sporadic protests against his oppressive leadership. This is mainly due to discontent over the rising cost of living and the worsening economic crisis. He also faces two international arrest warrants issued by the International Criminal Court in The Hague on charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Last year, up to 40 people were killed in clashes with security forces. Demonstrators have been on the streets almost daily since mid-December, calling for an end to the long rule of President al-Bashir.

The state restricts what is broadcast on TV and radio and influences what is published in the private press. A recent agreement provided protection for non-Arabs, but conversion to Christianity is legally punishable by death and believers in Sudan face strong persecution.

Christians comprise only 7% of the population, according to Operation World. This has meant that many Muslims in Sudan remain unreached with the gospel and many workers are needed. Christians are able to enter Sudan, but are not allowed to proselytise. It is very difficult to import Bibles and Christian literature into the country.

Nonetheless, we have heard encouraging reports from a worker in neighbouring Chad that the number of Muslim background believers in Darfur in western Sudan is growing; hundreds are coming to Christ. As we so often hear, when the church is persecuted, the number of believers increases.

• Let’s keep praying for the peace of Sudan.

• Pray that God would fan the faith of Sudan’s small community of believers to join Him in establishing His church among Muslims.

• Praise God for the growing number of believers, despite the persecution they face. Let’s pray there is a multiplication as Muslim Background Believers (MBBs) tell their friends about Jesus.

• There are 94 different languages spoken within Sudan. Let’s pray for Bible translations to be available in all languages, despite the restrictions.

Source of some material: http://en.etnopedia.org/wiki/index.php?title=Harasi,_Harsiyyat

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2 days ago

Introduction to Sudan, Chad and South Sudan Pop: 71 million Muslim: 72%

The countries of Sudan, Chad and South Sudan in Northeast Africa aren’t easy places to live in. The climate is harsh with hot summers and unpredictable rainfall. In this dry and dusty region, comforts are few and in many areas public infrastructure is weak. The lack of water impacts health and agriculture. Illiteracy and famine continue to be widespread too.

Parts of the region have experienced ongoing civil violence and ethnic division for years, making long-term stability uncertain. It also means this region experiences some of the most extreme poverty.

Due to traditional tribal migration patterns, many Muslim people groups have seen their clans separated by international borders.

Within this large and dispersed population, there are hundreds of unengaged Muslim people groups in these three countries who still have no one bringing them the healing hope of Jesus Christ. “The harvest is plentiful, but the labourers are few.” (Luke 10:2) Nevertheless, spiritual history is being written in this very generation! God is doing something new as Frontiers teams make disciples and help catalyse movements to Christ in Northeast Africa.

The doors of opportunity are wide open. Those skilled in education, medicine, engineering and other professions will find remarkable ease of access into even the most remote corners of the region.

More workers are desperately needed to help bring the Good News to Northeast Africa’s unengaged Muslim people groups. It will require workers who courageously embrace the harsh physical realities of the region.

You can watch a one-minute video of this region here https://vimeo.com/98947819

• Ask the Lord to send more cross-cultural workers with professional skills who are unafraid to live simply for Christ in remote areas.

• Pray for new field workers skilled as doctors, teachers and engineers to help bring lasting change.

• Ask that righteous political leaders would recognise and serve the true needs of the region.

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4 days ago

Saturday 16th March

Milk and Honey – an article from a Frontiers worker in Northeast Africa

“Recently I sat in my teammate’s home, sharing a breakfast of spiced coffee and fried dough as we chatted about new friends, neighbourhood happenings and things we’ve been learning.

Our conversation turned toward the hard things that local Muslim women, our friends, face here: abuse, rape, war, hunger, poverty, corruption, lies, deceit and being only one of several wives. These are normal things women in this country experience.

I remember crying after hearing Aiseta, my language helper, telling me about the traumas in her own life. She was raped by her teacher at the age of 13 and became pregnant. Aiseta was shamed and blamed for the incident; the teacher was never punished, and he denied even knowing her. No one helped her when her baby girl was born. Since she had no clothes for her baby, Aiseta kept her wrapped in an old headscarf until she could buy clothes.

She’s experienced so much sorrow. Perhaps that’s why she recognised the treasure of the Gospel when I shared it with her. She listened eagerly and quickly embraced the promise of eternal life in Jesus Christ.

Sadly, I’ve grown accustomed to hearing my friends share their tragedies. Sometimes I’m shocked when I hear a woman say that nothing bad has ever happened to her.

It’s easy to become calloused. I’d be too emotional to get through my days if I didn’t harden my heart every time I heard about another sorrow. But have I become too hardened? Too calloused? How do I find a balance?

As I left my teammate’s home that morning, I decided to stop and visit Rabia, one of my Muslim friends. Rabia was happy to see me and stopped her washing to chat with me. We sat under the shade of a tree, and she laid her sleeping 4-month-old son between us. A few minutes later, Rabia’s mother arrived. She’d been busy in the fields and hadn’t visited in several weeks.

Even though her little grandson was sound asleep, Grandma scooped him up and lavished him with kisses. Over and over again, she kissed him: cheek, cheek, forehead, lips… cheek, cheek, forehead, lips.

The little boy opened one eye. And instead of crying, he smiled and looked right into his sweet grandmother’s grinning face. They looked smitten, full of love for one another.

Pay attention, I felt the Lord say to me as I blinked back tears over this precious sight. This is how you don’t get too hardened here, I felt Him say. Pay attention to the little glimpses of sweetness I show you here.

Rabia poured us small glasses of warm milk, handed out some bread, and placed a plate full of honey for us to dip our bread into—a mini feast to accompany the love between grandmother and grandchild.

What a privilege to partake in our Muslim friends’ lives, so full of pain and hardship. My teammates and I are here to invite them into Jesus’ Kingdom. We are honoured to present to them the hope of the gospel and to share in their joy.

And sometimes, God reminds us of His sweet love when a friend like Rabia serves us milk and honey.”

• Let’s call out for the women of Somalia who face hardship and rejection, to find the One who can heal the broken-hearted and bind up all their wounds. (Ps 147:3).

• Pray for more workers to go to this region and introduce women and men who face such hardship to the One who understands their suffering and offers new life in Christ.

• Pray for Somalis to find joy and purpose in serving the Lord.

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5 days ago

Friday 15th March

Mushunguli People Pop: 41,000 Muslim: 99%

To say that the Mushungulis of Somalia have a difficult life would be an understatement.

The Mushunguli are said to have descended from fugitive slaves who escaped from their Somali masters in northeast Tanzania around 1840. Many migrated to Somalia in search of security from the slave-trade. Mainstream Somalis look down upon them because of their slave origins.

In recent years their homeland has been ruled by the terrorist organisation Al-Shabaab. While some Mushunguli support al-Shabaab, many men have been forced against their will to work or fight for them, and many women are forced to ‘marry’ terrorist fighters. Others attempt to grow crops so they can survive. They are often treated like slaves by the other Somalis.

Food and other essential supplies worth millions of pounds have been donated to Somalia by the United Nations and Christian agencies. But, unfortunately, much of it ends up in the hands of terrorists or clan militias. Conditions have been so bad for the Mushungulis that many have fled to refugee camps in Kenya. Several thousand Mushunguli refugees have made it to American cities.

Over 99% of the Mushungulis are Muslims. But there are some believers and in Somalia, these believers face terrible persecution from Al-Shabaab. Even as refugees they are still cast out from their communities.

• Pray these people will be able to care for their families and live in safety and peace.

• Pray that the few believers become the leaders of Mushunguli churches in Somalia, who draw in others from their communities.

• Pray for the few Christians among the Mushunguli tribe, that they will find each other, fellowship together and grow in their faith.

Source: http://www.globalprayerdigest.org/issue/day/mushunguli-people/

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6 days ago

Thursday 14th March

Somalis Pop: 10.7 million Muslim: 99%

In Somalia, the largest ethnic group are the Somalis, making up 85% of the population. They range from well-to-do, educated urbanites to nomads struggling for the basic necessities such as water. The majority of the population are on the lower end of the economic spectrum and very few children go to school. Since the language did not have a written script until 1972, many adults are illiterate.

The Somalis depend on their camels. There is one camel for every 2.5 humans. The camel is a Somali’s ‘car,’ his ‘bank account,’ and his ‘food pantry.’ The more camels a man has, the greater his standing in the community. Camel milk is a major source of nutrition and herdsmen may drink up to eleven litres a day. Camel meat is savoured at celebrations and the fatty hump is the most prized portion. Interestingly, the name of the people comes from “so maal,” which is an expression of hospitality meaning “Go milk a beast for yourself!”

Somalis are Muslims who believe that their religious leaders have the power to bless and curse. This power lingers around tombs and helps cure illness following a visit to a tomb. Less than one percent of Somalis follow Christ, and these believers are despised by their countrymen. But there are a growing number of believers. Some will now have available the newly translated Old Testament books of Jonah and Ruth which were released in a minority language spoken by 1.75 million Somalis at the end of February. These are audio books with text that highlights phrase by phrase as Scripture is being read. These are being distributed via a smartphone reading/listening app and a website.

• Praise God that a Christian Somali website that normally gets 2,000 visits in a month had over 15,000 visits last May! People responded to a song about Jesus that had been advertised on Facebook. Please pray that many more Somalis will listen to the song and that the Lord will speak to them and they will put their faith in Jesus Christ. (Source: Pray Africa).

• Pray for the peoples of Somalia to come together with the united purpose of building a nation to glorify the King of kings.

• Pray for the Somali Muslim background believers to stay faithful. Last December, Pray Africa reported the following: “Please pray for the new Somali believer who is a language teacher. He became a believer last August. We are praying that he will know how to conduct himself, and when and how to reveal his faith to his family.”

Did you know? As a country, Somalia has the largest population of camels!

Source: http://www.globalprayerdigest.org/issue/day/somalis-in-somalia/

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Waiting for snow…. Overlay

Waiting for snow…. 19th Mar 2019

Sometimes God asks me to wait and I don’t want to, and other times I am the one dragging my heels when God is saying “Let’s go, the time is right”.

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Wednesday 20th March

Vision for Sudan

In January this year, Mission Network News (MNN) reported on Vision2020 - a church planting movement that is sweeping the world. This involves m...

Pray Now
Called to the Nations Overlay 09 Feb 2019 09:00 - 20:30
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Called to the Nations

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